HomeReviewsBook SigningsBlogBooksBioAncient World Notes
Archive Newer | Older

Friday, October 30, 2015

October Book Signing Update

 

Book Signing Follow-ups

 

The signings for the month of October (3rd - 24th) have been a mixture of hit and miss. The most successful one took place at Barnes & Noble, Blossom Hill, San Jose, California (see enclosed photo). The rest (see book signing page for the list) were either so-so or, unfortunately, duds. Helena, Montana, and Shadle Park, Spokane, Washington, were the best ones of the so-so group (see enclosed photos). Despite the less than stellar turnouts, every book manager asked that I return in 2016. I am looking at my options. I will return to some of the stores for sure (already made arrangements for the Hastings South Hill and Shadle Park stores in Spokane, Washington). The Blossom Hill Barnes & Noble store I will return for a signing May 7, 2016.



 Jess Steven Hughes Book Signings

 

    New Reader Alexandra The Wolf of Britannia.jpg                 New Reader Austin at Helena Hastings            New reader Chris at Shadle Hastings
 Alexandra, B&N Blossom Hill, San Jose, CA                  Austin, Hastings, Helena, MT                 Chris, Shadle Park, Hastings, Spokane, WA

Thank you Barnes & Noble and Hastings Book Stores



 

Review - The Wolf of Britannia, Part I 

 

For those of you who still have not purchased or read a copy of The Wolf of Britannia, Part I, below is a review by renowned author of historical fiction and fantasy, Janet Morris.

This review is from: The Wolf of Britannia Part I (Paperback)

 

 First I should say that I previously read Jess Steven Hughes' "Sign of

 the Eagle," an loved it -- for me it was a story told by a modern

 Umberto Ecco, without the academic conceit that made that book slow and

 creaky. So I approached The World of Britannia somewhat hesitantly:

 I'd loved that one; would I like this as well? Or was Sign of the Eagle

 a fluke? I am here to testify that Sign of the Eagle was no fluke. The

 author is a natural story teller. His domain is the Celts at the dusk

 of Roman rule. His story's are humanistic, full of mystery, suspense --

 yes, and violence where needed. There are so few good historical novels

 written today that are not bodice rippers meant only for women that this

 book is a breath of fresh air. I dare say women will like this story as

 much as men. And although it is a "Part I, " Wolf a complete,

 satisfying story -- another thing rare in a time of endless sagas with

 no beginnings or endings.

 

 Story about what, you ask? Wolf of Britannia, Part I, is a novel of

 action and suspense, panoramic and thrilling, set in First Century AD

 Britain where soon-to-be-legendary Prince Caratacus, a young Celtic

 warrior, struggles to unite disparate interests against an enemy that

 has brought the world to its knees: Imperial Rome.

 

 The prince and his warrior wife Rhian face not only Roman enemies, but a

 treacherous brother who'll do anything to take the throne. This writer,

 Jess Steven Hughes, has a deep and learned understanding of human

 failings and human heroism; in this story's dramatic depths, both are

 crafted by a master hand.

 

 Young and noble Prince Caratacus risks life and limb to save his country

 and the world he knows and loves -- it never occurs to him not to try,

 even against the most fearsome odds. Your pulse will race as this

 wonderful story brings you eye to eye with enemies born of internal

 strife and home-grown treachery, and those who represent the tyranny of

 Rome.

 

 Despite the demands of research, the difficulty of writing about the

 last days of Celtic Britain with a fresh eye, Hughes succeeds in bringing us

 something new in his story of these misty times: an understanding of the

 best and worst of humanity that feels as if it were gained firsthand.

 

 This story is a great adventure, and those are few and far between. I

 look forward to Part II, but found Part 1 of The wolf of Britannia to be

 fulfilling in every way. Five well-deserved stars.

 

Arles Frescoes  Ancient Roman Frescoes Worthy of Pompeii Found in France 

 

 

Archaeologists have unearthed extremely rare ancient Roman frescoes, comparable to those found in the Villa of Mysteries in Pompeii, in the southern city of Arles.

The unexpected discovery was made during a dig on the remains of a Roman villa near a car park in the Trinquetaille district of the historic French city, which began last year.

For more details, click on the link below.

 Ancient Roman Frescoes 

 

Cleopatra  Scholars Debunk Cleopatra's Death by Cobra

 

Archaeologists have unearthed extremely rare ancient Roman frescoes, comparable to those found in the Villa of Mysteries in Pompeii, in the southern city of Arles.

The unexpected discovery was made during a dig on the remains of a Roman villa near a car park in the Trinquetaille district of the historic French city, which began last year.

For further details click onto below link.


Cleopatra

 

Roman CalvarymanThe Broken Lance - Update 

 

 

I am in the process of reviewing the entire novel. So far, I have reviewed the first thirty chapters, making several minor changes. The most significant was to chapter 15 which describes the Battle of Maugh-Dun (Maiden) Castle. I did so based on the latest archaeological discoveries made in the area, which changed my version of the Roman assault. I still have five chapters left to read to the Spokane Novelist Group. Because the novel is more than 167,000 words, I will split it into a duo-logy, two books. Regardless of where I am at in my review, I will email the entire manuscript to my book doctor, April 1, 2016, for her analysis and critique. 

 

 

Maintaining the Public Safety of Ancient Rome 

 

Click onto the Ancient World Notes box for the latest installment, Maintaining the Public Safety of Ancient Rome, Part XXI. I describe the great civil war of 69 A.D. known as, The Year of the Four Emperors, one of the bloodiest civil wars in Roman history.

 

That's it for now. Until next time, Ave At Que Vale! Hail and farewell!



 

Jess Steven Hughes

 

 

10:51 am pdt          Comments


Archive Newer | Older